Tag Archives: rejection

Rejection Deconstructed

It’s The MonaAlegOhio, Summer 2017.

In keeping with Mr. Wendig’s contribution, just prior to right now, I want to talk more about rejection, and how it absolutely is not something to worry about. I write from experience, as I have done sales in the past, and have been rejected plenty.

In insurance sales, there’s a rule of thumb that goes for every ten people you call, one will be willing to talk with you. For every ten people willing to talk with you, one will close on something you’re offering. And, results, naturally, vary with how well you present your case, and with exactly what it is that you’re selling. In real estate, for instance, the odds are longer initially, because nobody knows you from anybody, and they don’t trust you. Which is reasonable.

Book sales are still sales. Yes, you introverted kid you, it is necessary to plug your product. You can, of course, simply publish your work and then plug that. Or you can plug your unpublished work to agents and editors, sending query letters, pitching in person. Everybody involved in writing anything ends up knowing all about these things, right? And, what happens? In my experience, there are two types of rejections you receive as a writer. The first, unfortunately common, response to a query is, ready for it? Nothing! Nada! Rien! NIchts! As Caesar would say, NIHIL! Then there are the good ones.

The good ones are good by virtue of being real and definite. When I get an actual rejection note via email or messaging (I guess snail mail is still possible but I haven’t seen one in years) I am overjoyed that the person took the time to at least drop me a form note. My very favorite rejection letter (it was via USPS) was from Mad Magazine, because it was truly funny. Those are the rejections which I savor, those ones with a modicum of personal touch to them.

If you’ve published a few books that sold well, your marketing gets easier, but you’ll still get rejected a lot. And, here’s my advice about that:

DON’T WORRY ABOUT IT!

Ever heard the advice, “Just keep doing it?” Well, that’s true. You will be rejected, by many, and by some who will, in time, come to regret the fact that they rejected you. (Think Decca Records and The Beatles.) Keep writing, keep plugging your product. If one thing just won’t sell, write something else. You are a writer, right?

Self-Rejection: What It Is, Why You Do It, And How To Eject Its Ass Out The Airlock

Yes, my own post is next. This seemed too good not to share.

Here, then, is a cardinal truth in creative industries (and there are very few cardinal truths in creative industries): you are going to be rejected. A lot. A lot a lot. A lottalottalot. It’s…

Source: Self-Rejection: What It Is, Why You Do It, And How To Eject Its Ass Out The Airlock

But What If He Likes It?

Cabo San Lucas, September 2018.

A quick post this week to let the world know that I am anxious because I am meeting with an agent about my YA romance, I hope this week, and I don’t know if I’m more scared of it being rejected, or of what happens if he likes it. Rejection doesn’t bother me. I used to sell insurance. I used to sell real estate. Most of your interactions result in rejections. I’ve even sent thank-you notes to agents when they sent me a rejection, because that is so much better than the “dropped it down a deep, deep well” response. (That’s no response, if you don’t’ get it.)

But I’ve had very little experience, writing-wise, with acceptance. A few little things, yes, but nothing serious enough to really care about. What if he decides to rep it and nobody wants to buy it? What if I hate what my eventual editor wants to do to it? What if I’m not ready to promote a book the way it needs to be promoted? What if? Huh?

This pitch is different because I already know the agent in other contexts. He’s a good speaker, for instance. It all seems more intense when it involves someone I interact with already. It shouldn’t be. As I said, rejection is no big deal. Which leaves me to worry about acceptance.

So, anyway, I will of course report on the results. Gotta worry about something, huh?